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Go Red to celebrate health

I'm always looking for new soup recipes. And for the most part, soups generally are loaded with vegetables and other good things that help keep us healthy. Sure, I'll occasionally come across a soup recipe that doesn't quite fit into the category...

I'm always looking for new soup recipes.

And for the most part, soups generally are loaded with vegetables and other good things that help keep us healthy.

Sure, I'll occasionally come across a soup recipe that doesn't quite fit into the category of what I consider nutritious, but those generally are few and far between.

The most recent soup recipe that I've tried Rustic Italian Tomato Soup falls into the former category. It comes from the American Heart Association's Learn and Live cookbook.

The slightly revamped version of the soup (see recipe on Page 2B) contains, among other things, frozen red bell pepper strips, diced tomatoes, navy beans, chicken broth, garlic, balsamic vinegar, an assortment of herbs, including fresh basil, along with a sprinkling of red pepper flakes. (Note the red-colored ingredients.)

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The soup, which we've already had for supper at home and thoroughly enjoyed, will be one that I will be making at Friday night's Go Red For Women event (sponsored by the American Heart Association and Dakota Medical Foundation) in UND's Wellness Center.

Go Red For Women is the AHA's nationwide movement, started in 2004, that celebrates the energy, passion and power women have as they band together to wipe out heart disease. The color red and the red dress have become linked with the ability all women have to improve their heart health and live stronger, longer lives.

Go Red North Dakota, a three-year, $1.25 million initiative, was launched in February 2006 by the Dakota Medical Foundation and the AHA's Go Red For Women movement.

I will be joined in cooking by Kim Holmes of Sanders 1907, who will demonstrate chicken breasts in a tomato sauce.

The "red" style show also will feature red clothing from Macy's.

The event is for families in the community and is free (as is the parking). Those attending will be able to sample the dishes being demonstrated (food will be provided by Campus Catering), as well as receive heart-healthy prizes.

The emcee for the 7 p.m. event, sponsored by the Dakota Medical Foundation, the AHA and Go Red North Dakota, will be WDAZ-TV anchor Terry Dullum.

I feel honored to be part of the event. Not only do I get to share the stage with one of the area's leading culinary experts, I'll be getting my first look at UND's state-of-the-art student health center.

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And I'll probably be able to exchange some quips again with one of local television's most recognizable faces. Last month, we were friendly rivals in a Salvation Army bell ringoff.

I wonder if Terry will bring me a red hairnet.

Tiedeman is food editor at the Herald. He can be reached at 780-1136 or toll-free at (800) 477-6572, ext. 136, or jtiedeman@gfherald.com .

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