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GGFYP names new director

Corey Mock, a state lawmaker and former head of the Third Street Clinic, has been named executive director of Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals, the group said Thursday.

Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals logo

Corey Mock, a state lawmaker and former head of the Third Street Clinic, has been named executive director of Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals, the group said Thursday.

He said after getting to know the group's board of directors and its membership better, he wants to help members get more involved with the community.

GGFYP has for several years brought young professionals together with experienced professionals to benefit from the latter's experience, he said. At the same time, it's also been kind of a training ground for young leaders who can help contribute to other nonprofit groups in the community, he said.

As GGFYP director, he said he hopes to intensify those efforts.

Mock takes over Jan. 6 from Stacey Dimmler, who is stepping down to be the new events coordinator for Scheels All Sports in Grand Forks.

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He has been a GGFYP member himself for many years and has seen the group grow. Since 2010, when the group started the Launch Grand Forks project to get young professionals more involved in the community, he said he's seen membership increase from 50 to nearly 300.

Mock credits Dimmler for that growth.

In a news release, GGFYP highlighted Mock's experience at the Third Street Clinic, a clinic that serves the uninsured: "He brings with him a toolkit of valuable skills including management, fundraising, grant writing, community development, and networking."

Mock, a 28-year-old Minot native, is also assistant minority leader in the North Dakota House. He's currently pursuing a masters degree in community and urban development from UND.

Call Tran at (701) 780-1248; (800) 477-6572, ext. 1248; or send email to ttran@gfherald.com .

Corey Mock

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