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GF to haul waste to Fargo for a month

The city of Grand Forks will begin hauling garbage to Fargo's landfill about the middle of the month after failing to win support from the airport to keep its existing landfill open a month longer.

The city of Grand Forks will begin hauling garbage to Fargo's landfill about the middle of the month after failing to win support from the airport to keep its existing landfill open a month longer.

Public Works Director Todd Feland said Monday this would cost about $200,000 a month.

He'd been hoping to save that by keeping the existing landfill open until its replacement opens. Initially, he projected the opening date to be mid-October but now thinks mid-September is possible, which would save the city money.

Firm contract

A few weeks ago, Feland reported that only one trucking firm wanted a contract of two months or less, and it asked for a lot of money. Now, he said, he'd lease trucks and use city workers as drivers instead, which though it doesn't appear to save money, would give the city more flexibility because there is no contract to cancel or extend should the landfill completion date change.

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The federal government considers the existing landfill a hazard to low-flying aircraft, especially ones that would land at Grand Forks International Airport's new runway, which is expected to be done Aug. 17. The feds reiterated their position recently, and the airport concurred, denying the city its support.

City leaders said it was worth a try, but the city did promise to close the landfill as soon as the runway is done.

"You can't blame them," City Council member Art Bakken said.

Reach Tran at (701) 780-1248; (800) 477-6572, ext. 248; or send e-mail to ttran@gfherald.com .

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