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GF mother in drunken breast-feeding case ordered to start serving sentence

In the wake of a run-in with police that led to two more criminal charges, a Grand Forks mother convicted in a case of breast-feeding while drunk has been ordered to stay in jail and start serving a six-month sentence on a child-neglect charge.

In the wake of a run-in with police that led to two more criminal charges, a Grand Forks mother convicted in a case of breast-feeding while drunk has been ordered to stay in jail and start serving a six-month sentence on a child-neglect charge.

Stacey Anvarinia, 26, had been allowed to spend at least part of her sentence at a substance abuse treatment facility, but Judge Sonja Clapp of the State District Court rescinded that option today.

Police arrested Anvarinia Friday night, just hours after her sentencing, at her apartment in Grand Forks. The owner of a pickup parked in the apartment building's lot told police that Anvarinia slashed one of the truck's tires.

Citing a report, the judge said officers found Anvarinia hiding in a closet and appearing intoxicated. The judge said Anvarinia resisted arrest and that she had cuts on her wrist which prompted authorities to take her to Altru Hospital before transporting her to the Grand Forks County jail.

Anvarinia was consequently charged with criminal mischief and preventing arrest, both are Class A misdemeanors punishable with up to a year in jail and a $2,000 fine.

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She entered not guilty pleas on those charges today and has a pretrial conference set for Sept. 24.

In February, Anvarinia was arrested after police reported seeing her handle her 6-week-old baby roughly and breast-feed the infant while intoxicated. She was charged with child neglect and later pleaded guilty. The unusual case received international media attention.

--Archie Ingersoll

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