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Frosty Bobber frozen for one more year

At least another year will go by before the fun and games of the Frosty Bobber ice-fishing competition return to the Red River in Grand Forks and East Grand Forks.

At least another year will go by before the fun and games of the Frosty Bobber ice-fishing competition return to the Red River in Grand Forks and East Grand Forks.

Since 1995, the American Red Cross Red River chapter has organized the fund-raising contest. Until last year, when it first was suspended, the event was a winter highlight for many, even in the first three years when no fish were caught at all.

The Red Cross put the event on hold last year after then-director Shelly Goss said the time, money and energy required made the event an iffy investment for the organization.

Now, the Red Cross is under different leadership and newly appointed director Danny Holwerda is excited about reviving the tradition.

"I am new on the board, so I don't think an event of that nature can be done in three weeks," said Holwerda. "But I don't see any reason why we can't do it and do it up right."

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Sometime around the end of spring or the beginning of June, Holwerda said, he hopes to put a call out to businesses in the community to see what kind of interest there is in reawakening the Frosty Bobber.

"We hope that it can be something bigger and better to really showcase the Grand Cities," he said.

Reach Rude at (701) 787-6754, (800) 477-6572, ext. 754; or arude@gfherald.com .

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