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Former Minnesota coach pleads guilty in kidnapping of girls

ANOKA, Minn. -- A former coach pleaded guilty Wednesday to kidnapping and sexually assaulting two 13-year-old girls he met online. Casey Lee Chinn, 23, fought back tears at times as he told the court how he met the girls online and arranged to pi...

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ANOKA, Minn. -- A former coach pleaded guilty Wednesday to kidnapping and sexually assaulting two 13-year-old girls he met online.

Casey Lee Chinn, 23, fought back tears at times as he told the court how he met the girls online and arranged to pick them up from their Andover homes Sept. 29, according to Leah Palmer, spokeswoman for the Anoka County attorney's office.

Chinn pleaded guilty to two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct and two counts of kidnapping during the hearing at Anoka County District Court.

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He also agreed to accept a roughly 11-year prison term when he is sentenced in April.

His family and those of the girls were at the proceeding. The girls' relatives had tears in their eyes, Palmer said.

Chinn's attorney could not be reached for comment.

Once Chinn and the girls arrived at his Burnsville residence, he reportedly told them to enter via the back door and stay in the basement because he lived with his parents.

Both girls then performed oral sex on Chinn and he had intercourse with one of them, court documents say.

An Amber Alert was issued once the girls' parents realized they were missing. Police found them crying and crouching behind a couch in Chinn's basement early the next morning.

Chinn was working as a part-time volleyball coach for Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Minneapolis at the time.

He had previously served as a volunteer coach for the junior varsity baseball team at East Ridge High School in Woodbury and as a part-time, seasonal coach and referee for All Saints Catholic Church in Lakeville.

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He met the girls on OMEGLE, a social media site that provides avenues for people to "talk to strangers," according to its website.

The three began talking and eventually exchanged sexually explicit pictures before agreeing on a time to meet in person.

Chinn was charged with kidnapping because the girls were younger than 16 and Chinn did not have the consent of their parents to take them to his home.

An attorney representing Chinn said in October that his parents were "devastated" about what had happened.

"The plea agreement is satisfactory to both victims' families, as well as our office," Anoka County Attorney Tony Palumbo said. "This case serves as a reminder for parents to talk to their kids about online safety and the 'stranger danger' that exists on the Internet."

Chinn will be sentenced April 1.

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