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Former Grafton ambulance director accused of embezzling

GRAFTON, N.D.--A former Grafton ambulance employee has been accused of stealing funds from the emergency service. On Wednesday, Walsh County District Judge Barbara Whelan set bond at $10,000 for James Russell Restemayer, 48, who was charged with ...

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James Russell Restemayer

GRAFTON, N.D.-A former Grafton ambulance employee has been accused of stealing funds from the emergency service.

On Wednesday, Walsh County District Judge Barbara Whelan set bond at $10,000 for James Russell Restemayer, 48, who was charged with a Class A felony of misapplication of entrusted property. The former Valley Ambulance and Rescue Service director allegedly "caused a loss in excess of $50,000" to the Grafton organization, according to court documents.

The Herald was unable to confirm how long Restemayer was employed with the service or when his employment ended, but a review of credit card and bank statements between January 2015 and August 2018 showed Restemayer used the agency's credit card for paying utility bills, veterinarian bills, vehicle fuel and repairs, funeral home expenses, cellphone bills and paying for vacations and meals, according to court documents.

He then would pay off the credit card with the ambulance service's checking account, court documents said.

If convicted, Restemayer could be sentenced to a maximum of 20 years in prison.

Related Topics: GRAFTON
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