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Former DOT employee accused of embezzlement

BISMARCK -- A former employee of the North Dakota Department of Transportation's Motor Vehicle Division is facing felony charges that she embezzled thousands of dollars in customer transactions.

BISMARCK - A former employee of the North Dakota Department of Transportation's Motor Vehicle Division is facing felony charges that she embezzled thousands of dollars in customer transactions.

Dorma Jean Steier, 62, of Mandan, N.D., is charged with felony counts of theft, forgery and deceptive writings. She is set for trial in early January.

DOT spokeswoman Jamie Olson said Steier worked about 18 years for DOT. Steier was terminated in December 2017 before a criminal investigation began.

Court documents say Steier voided 459 cash, check, debit and credit transactions from June 2016 to December 2017, resulting in "cash theft, document manipulation and forgery," totaling more than $28,000.

North Dakota Highway Patrol began its investigation when a person paid for license plate tabs through the mail but never received them.

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A state trooper wrote that the tabs were paid for, but by a check from a different person, which led to the discovery of similar instances.

The case's affidavit says Steier also voided vehicle title transactions and changed original purchase prices to lower dollar figures, and allegedly forged a title to hide her actions.

Olson said DOT has "remedied" the transactions from the case's time frame and implemented additional controls.

Court documents also say the theft occurred after DOT implemented a new software system, which Olson said helped trace the transactions involved in the case.

"It allowed us to have that record," she said.

Related Topics: TRANSPORTATION
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