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Fisherman rescued after river sweeps him into Lake Superior

A fisherman was saved today from Lake Superior after being swept into the lake by the Lester River. The man was in the middle of the river at the mouth "and the current just caught him and swept him out," said Shane Lindemoen of St. Paul. Lindemo...

A fisherman was saved today from Lake Superior after being swept into the lake by the Lester River.

The man was in the middle of the river at the mouth "and the current just caught him and swept him out," said Shane Lindemoen of St. Paul.

Lindemoen and two others tried pushing a log that was floating near the river's mouth out to the man but the current pushed it back to shore. Lindemoen and another man debated going into the water to reach the man but decided not to. "It's way too cold," Lindemoen said. "I'm surprised the guy was able to keep his head up without a life jacket."

The man was rescued by people in a small boat and brought to shore. Lindemoen believes the people were civilians.

Duluth Fire Department Assistant Chief Erik Simonson said the Six Engine, which is located only eight blocks away, was first on the scene and assisted with the rescue. "He was out too deep and couldn't move and was getting swept out," Simonson said of the fisherman. "It was real close to being too late."

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The Duluth News Tribune and the Herald are Forum Communications Co. newspapers.

The man was transported to a local hospital by Gold Cross Ambulance.

Related Topics: LAKE SUPERIOR
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