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Fergus Falls woman charged with chasing man with butcher knife

FERGUS FALLS, Minn. -- A 41-year-old Fergus Falls woman reportedly attacked a man with a butcher knife last weekend, according to the Otter Tail County District Court case file. A man reportedly came to 714 Springen Ave. around 11 a.m. Saturday t...

 

FERGUS FALLS, Minn. -- A 41-year-old Fergus Falls woman reportedly attacked a man with a butcher knife last weekend, according to the Otter Tail County District Court case file.

A man reportedly came to 714 Springen Ave. around 11 a.m. Saturday to pick up property he left at the residence when Deatte Deann Luehring allegedly came out the back door of the residence and started running at the man with a large butcher knife. The man got back into his pickup and Luehring started stabbing the pickup driver side window with the knife.gouging the driver’s side window and breaking off the driver’s side mirror, said the court documents. The man had no injuries in the incident.

When Fergus Falls police arrived on scene, Luehring fought with the officers and kicked them before they contained her. Luehring had her first appearance in Otter Tail County District Court Tuesday. She faces charges of felony-level second-degree assault with a dangerous weapon, gross misdemeanor obstruction of legal process and misdemeanor property damage.

Related Topics: FERGUS FALLS
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