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FEMA processes millions for flood assistance

More than $5,367,000 is being processed by FEMA for payment to eligible applicants in 28 counties to reimburse the costs of public assistance projects from spring flooding in Minnesota. To date, more than 634 requests have been combined into 1,40...

More than $5,367,000 is being processed by FEMA for payment to eligible applicants in 28 counties to reimburse the costs of public assistance projects from spring flooding in Minnesota. To date, more than 634 requests have been combined into 1,409 sub grant applications.

The grants cover debris removal, emergency protective measures, and the repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly owned facilities like roads, bridges, water control facilities, public buildings and equipment, utilities, and parks and recrea-tional facilities.

Permits must be secured before delivery of any funds from FEMA through the state. If all paperwork is correct, it normally takes no more than two weeks from the time a project worksheet is submitted to FEMA to obligate money to the state. It takes another three weeks to put the funds in the hands of the applicant. The paperwork must be as accurate as possi-ble because everything is subject to state and federal audit.

Eligible applicants will receive 75 percent of their allowable costs for their projects.

Related Topics: 2009 FLOOD
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