Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Favre the Viking: What they're writing

Brett Favre's return to football -- now as a Minnesota Viking -- has spurred scores of commentary around the country. Here are some samples: Favre parachutes into an offense without benefit of the off-season program or training camp. He doesn't k...

Brett Favre's return to football -- now as a Minnesota Viking -- has spurred scores of commentary around the country. Here are some samples:

Favre parachutes into an offense without benefit of the off-season program or training camp. He doesn't know his new teammates and has no chemistry with them. He'll also play a career-high 10 games this season on artificial turf, which will take a toll on his ankles and knees. His 40-year-old body will feel like it's 50 come January. I would have loved a Favre acquisition by the Vikings if this were 1999. But it's 2009. I'd be surprised if they get their money's worth from Favre.

__Rich Gosselin, DallasNews.com

-----

"Maybe (Favre) really, truly lost (Packers fans) on Tuesday, when he signed with the hated Minnesota Vikings, and then in Favre fashion, said "If you're a true Packer fan, you understand."

ADVERTISEMENT

That was the line that still had fans fuming as they filed out of Stadium View Sports Bar in Green Bay, aptly named for its view of Lambeau Field down Armed Forces Drive. Some fans that had flocked for the Packers' evening practice on Tuesday piled into the bar to watch Favre's news conference. And ultimately they had a resounding opinion as they filed back out: Favre's iconic legacy in this city has hit a new low.

"I couldn't believe the 'true Packers fans' should understand thing," said Ron Knautz. "I'm 54 years old. I've been a Packers fan since I was 5, which is when I knew what the Packers were. I got my picture taken with Bart Starr when I was 12. I'm a true Packers fan. Maybe a true Packers player would understand how I feel."

__ Charles Robinson, Yahoo Sports

-----

I'm rooting for Favre. I think this whole affair is perfectly fine. It's football; not part of the real world. The real world deals with thorny things like health-care reform and the economy and unemployment. This is NOT the real world. This is a fairytale. This is sports. Anybody who thinks otherwise and wants to rip Brett Favre needs to get out and smell the roses.

__Rich Lieberman, San Francisco Chronicle

-----

Brad Childress has kept his hands steady on the rudder as he navigates the Favre tsunami. "If it makes us better, we do it. If it makes us better, we do it." So he's going to do it. In spite of the fact that it's a crime against the football unwrittens. In spite of the fact that his two quarterbacks not named Favre -- Tarvaris Jackson and Sage Rosenfels -- will be unable to fully believe a word he says to them when it comes to their jobs. In spite of the fact that he gave Favre a wink and a nod and a "get out of camp free" card when the rest of the Vikings have been sweating their guts off in Mankato, Minn. Childress did this A) because the Vikings have Super Bowl talent and B) because he's on the ropes, employment-wise.

ADVERTISEMENT

__Tom E. Curran, NBCSports.com

-----

This is all about winning, not about whether Favre is an egomaniac who can't bear the thought of living a quiet life in Hattiesburg, Miss. ...Is he disturbing the team's continuity by signing this late? For a while, perhaps, but he's going to make the Vikings better. Is he selfish? Very likely, but he's going to make the Vikings better. Is he the quarterback he once was? No, but he's going to make the Vikings better. All the crazy, ill-advised passes he throws -- he really is all about himself, isn't he? I attribute those passes to an incredible belief in himself, but the bottom-line answer is -- yes, that one again -- he's going to make the Vikings better. He might even make them a Super Bowl team. So if you're the Vikings, you don't give a flip about all his flip-flopping.

__ Rick Morrisey, Chicago Tribune

-----

Brett, you've lost me. You, too, Brad Childress. Now that you guys have completed this sham of a transaction, you ought to know just how bad this whole thing looks. And how badly it stinks. all that's happened, no one can tell me these two guys didn't have this all worked out in advance so Favre, who hates offseason workouts and hates two-a-day practices even more, could swoop in when the heavy lifting was done and take over. I have to believe that Favre and Childress, the ultimate enabler, knew all along that it would come to this. Which is why both had better be prepared for the criticism -- from inside and outside the organization -- they richly deserve.

__ Bob Glauber, Newsday

-----

ADVERTISEMENT

...the Favre deal opens a new vista of rich possibilities because if it didn't, the Vikings would actually be nuts, and the general rule of thumb is that when people do something truly loopy, there are only two reasons: One, they really are truly loopy. Two, they know something we don't.

Sometimes, it's a combination of the two, as this probably is. But we all know why it's loopy, so the trick is to find out why it's a good idea. And this is as good as it gets -- the Vikings are trying to break the system by making training camp, practices and daily attendance irrelevant.

The gamble is costing them only $25 million, and it could save them hundreds of millions on the back end. It's an investment that pays big if they (a) make the Super Bowl or (b) make practices teleconference-able. And it only cost Favre his respect. ...

__Ray Ratto, CBSSports.com

Related Topics: FOOTBALL
What To Read Next
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.