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Family of deceased EGF woman and Wal-Mart reach settlement

The family of a deceased East Grand Forks woman and Wal-Mart have reached a settlement, and the civil suit against the retail giant has been dismissed.

The family of a deceased East Grand Forks woman and Wal-Mart have reached a settlement, and the civil suit against the retail giant has been dismissed.

Cynthia Gaddie, 50, died after she fell while shopping at the Grand Forks store at 2551 32nd Ave. S. on July 24, 2007, according to the family's complaint. She had caught her foot on a clothing rack in a fitting room. Gaddie was then taken to the Altru Hospital emergency room, but died four weeks later, the complaint said, as a result of her injuries.

Wal-Mart said any injuries Gaddie suffered in the store were her own fault and not the "proximate" cause of her death, according to the company's response to the suit.

A notice of settlement was issued to both sides by the Grand Forks County District Clerk of Court on Sept. 7.

On Nov. 2, the case was dismissed. The Gaddie family's attorney said there is a confidentiality agreement in place and would not comment. Wal-Mart's attorney did not return calls for comment.

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The family was seeking a judgment of at least $50,000 plus attorney's fees.

Related Topics: WALMART
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