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EGF council to vote on new city administrator

The East Grand Forks City Council will vote to a hire a new city administrator at its meeting tonight in City Hall. Council members had selected Scott Huizenga, a project manager for Kansas City, Mo., after interviewing four finalists June 20. Ac...

The East Grand Forks City Council will vote to a hire a new city administrator at its meeting tonight in City Hall.

Council members had selected Scott Huizenga, a project manager for Kansas City, Mo., after interviewing four finalists June 20.

According to his proposed contract, he'd earn $83,000 in the first year and 3 percent more in the second if his performance is satisfactory.

The city had advertised the salary range for the position as $79,282 to $87,927.

Huizenga signed the contract last week and all that's left is the council's approval.

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Though he was the youngest of the finalists -- two of them had more than 30 years of experience -- council members were impressed with the breadth of his experience and his rapid rise through the ranks.

He'd been an executive with the Grafton (N.D.) Area Chamber of Commerce and a rural economic development official before going to Kansas City to work on that city's infrastructure improvements.

Other parts of Huizenga's contract include 15 days of vacation a year and as much as $7,500 for moving expenses.

His employment would be at-will, meaning the council can dismiss him at any time, though if there's no cause, he'd get three months pay.

East Grand Forks hasn't had a city administrator since the last one, Bob Brooks, passed away in January. Building inspections chief Jerry Skyberg has been in charge since then.

Reach Tran at (701) 780-1248; (800) 477-6572, ext. 248; or send e-mail to ttran@gfherald.com .

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