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EGF council member objects to cost of renovations

The East Grand Forks City Council voted Tuesday to replace the windows of the senior center with Infinity by Marvin Windows from Windows Plus, despite the objections of council member Clarence Vetter.

The East Grand Forks City Council voted Tuesday to replace the windows of the senior center with Infinity by Marvin Windows from Windows Plus, despite the objections of council member Clarence Vetter.

The total cost of the project will be $21,202.59.

"I can't justify spending that amount, so I'll be voting no," Vetter said in the Tuesday meeting, after he pulled the item from the consent agenda.

The council had received a bid that was 35 percent lower than the bid from Windows Plus, Vetter said. Vetter was the only council member to vote against the approval.

The council also voted to award a bid for street improvements to Opp Construction for a total amount of $1,282,387.50. City engineer Steve Emery told the council that because a substantial portion of the planned street improvements aimed to increase pedestrian safety, it might be possible to receive funding from the Minnesota Safe Routes to School program.

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After weeks of working on the details, the council also approved a new agreement between the city and the Red River RC Flyers for the use of city property as a radio-controlled flying field. A previous agreement gave the club reign over a smaller piece of city property. The purpose of the agreement is to give drone hobbyists a safe, reasonably controlled area to fly their small radio controlled aircraft.

Lisa Christianson was appointed to the to the library board, leaving one position to be filled on the board. Mayor Steve Gander said the position "will be filled in the weeks and months ahead."

Related Topics: EAST GRAND FORKS
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