ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

East Grand Forks Senior High celebrates milestone in construction project

Members of the East Grand Forks School Board, Superintendent Mike Kolness and Principal Brian Loer braved subzero temperatures and wind chill Thursday morning to celebrate finishing the structural phase of construction at Senior High School with ...

A steel beam signed by contractors, officials and students at East Grand Forks Senior High, is readied for placement atop the new addition at Senior High Thursday. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald
A steel beam signed by contractors, officials and students at East Grand Forks Senior High, is readied for placement atop the new addition at Senior High Thursday. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald
We are part of The Trust Project.

Members of the East Grand Forks School Board, Superintendent Mike Kolness and Principal Brian Loer braved subzero temperatures and wind chill Thursday morning to celebrate finishing the structural phase of construction at Senior High School with a topping-out ceremony.

Construction workers raised the final steel beam of the project's structural phase into place. The beam had been signed by students, teachers and staff and will remain visible after the additions to the school are complete.

"Thank you to the citizens of East Grand Forks," School Board Chairman Tony Palmiscno said to the small crowd. "This is a salute to all of us."

Construction project manager Tom McDonald explained that the tradition of a topping-out ceremony dates several centuries back to Scandinavia, intended to bring peace to tree-dwelling spirits disturbed during a construction process and instill positive spirits in the building for the future.

In the U.S., the tradition has expanded to include draping the American flag over the steel beam to show patriotism.

ADVERTISEMENT

Work on the $20.6 million project began last May. The additions include facilities for physical education and locker rooms, fine arts and STEM programs. The construction is expected to finish next fall.

"We've met a milestone on this project," McDonald said. "We want to take a moment to celebrate that."

Tanner Wightman of Anderson Steel Erection Crane Service unhooks the strap after the topping off beam was set in place at East Grand Forks Senior High's new addition Thursday. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald
Tanner Wightman of Anderson Steel Erection Crane Service unhooks the strap after the topping off beam was set in place at East Grand Forks Senior High's new addition Thursday. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

What to read next
Leafy greens are popping in area gardens. If you're not a big fan of kale, but still want the nutritional benefit, try adding some to a smoothie. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams shares a favorite green smoothie recipe that even some of the most kale-adverse people will like. Honest!
Only 7 percent of U.S. adults have optimal measures of health. But you can take steps to make your numbers better. In this Health Fusion column, Viv Williams explores a study about our nation's cardiometabolic health status. And she shares her own lifestyle lapses in judgement.
Experts warn that simply claiming the benefits may create paper trails for law enforcement officials in states criminalizing abortion. That will complicate life for the dozens of corporations promising to protect, or even expand, the abortion benefits for employees and their dependents.
In Minnesota, abortion is protected by the state’s constitution and is legal up to the point of viability, which is generally thought to begin at about 24 weeks, when the fetus can survive outside the womb. Those who work with Minnesotans who seek abortions say barriers, both legal and practical, forced some to travel to Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, Washington, D.C., and Wisconsin even prior to the Supreme Court’s decision.