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East Grand Forks school officials say music equipment was stolen

East Grand Forks School District officials are calling the disappearance of thousands of dollars worth of musical equipment a theft. The East Grand Forks School Board and district staff discussed the disappearance of about a dozen pieces of music...

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Grand Forks Herald file photo

 

East Grand Forks School District officials are calling the disappearance of thousands of dollars worth of musical equipment a theft.

The East Grand Forks School Board and district staff discussed the disappearance of about a dozen pieces of music equipment , including instruments and other items, at the school board's meeting Monday. District Superintendent Mike Kolness said the missing equipment, which included a guitar and amplifier, was valued at about $20,000.

"We've had some preliminary discussions with law enforcement," Kolness said, "Right now we just can't find a lead that gets us anywhere."

Kolness added that updates in the investigation will be discussed at upcoming board meetings.

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Kolness said after the meeting the September arrest of Philip Hartwig, an assistant junior varsity coach, would be addressed in the board's meeting next month, once coaching lists have been finalized for the upcoming sports seasons. Kolness said that Hartwig is a seasonally contracted employee of the school district and was not a district employee at the time of his arrest.

The school board also received an enrollment update showing a decrease of 20 students between Sept. 1 and Oct. 1. The districtwide number now sits at 1,886 students.

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