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Driver, 2 children hurt in car, school bus crash

Three people were injured, two of them children, when a school bus and a car collided this morning at a rural intersection west of the Grand Forks International Airport.

Three people were injured, two of them children, when a school bus and a car collided this morning at a rural intersection west of the Grand Forks International Airport.

Kevin Boyer, 56, rural Grand Forks, was extricated from the car he'd been driving and was transported to Altru Hospital. Two of the four children aboard the bus suffered non-life-threatening injuries in the accident and were transported to the hospital, according to North Dakota Highway Patrol Sgt. Aaron Hummel. The school bus driver, Marko Savatic, 20, Grand Forks, was not injured in the crash.

No information is being released about Boyer's condition, according to a nursing supervisor at Altru. Boyer, owner of Magoo's Tattoos, was driving eastbound on 20th Avenue, about two miles north of Highway 2, when his car collided with the Dietrich School Bus, driven by Savatic. The bus was travelling southbound on 18th Street Northeast, about a mile west of the airport.

The gravel road was unmarked. If there's no signs at an intersection, oncoming traffic yields to traffic on the right, Hummel said. He said he could not comment on whether there would be a citation or charges following the crash.

The accident remains under investigation.

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