Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Dorgan: Army Corps gears up for N.D. flood fight

FARGO -- There is an above-average risk of significant flooding across North Dakota this spring and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is already taking aggressive steps to meet the threat, information released by U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., shows.

FARGO -- There is an above-average risk of significant flooding across North Dakota this spring and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is already taking aggressive steps to meet the threat, information released by U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., shows.

"I will continue to work with the corps to make certain that North Dakota communities have all the federal help they need to fight any flooding," Dorgan said in releasing highlights of a report he received from the corps on the threat of flooding this spring.

The report, which was developed in conjunction with the National Weather Service, stated there is a 100 percent chance that the Red River at Fargo will exceed major flood stage.

There is a 90 percent chance of rivers exceeding major flood stage at cities such as Abercrombie, Lisbon, Harwood and West Fargo, the corps report stated.

Dorgan, who asked the corps in February to provide him with a flood threat assessment, listed several highlights of the report:

ADVERTISEMENT

- The corps has completed an inventory of flood-fight materials -- such as empty sandbags, pumps and plastic sheeting -- and will place them at critical locations later this month.

- Corps reservoirs in North Dakota and Minnesota are being drawn down to provide maximum retention capacity.

- Two districts that oversee corps operations in North Dakota have proclaimed emergency declarations and set up crisis management teams to help prepare community leaders.

The corps report provided to Dorgan states that locations that have a greater than 50 percent chance of reaching or exceeding major flood level include Wahpeton, Valley City, Drayton and Pembina in North Dakota, and Halstad and Oslo in Minnesota.

Related Topics: 2010 FLOODS
What To Read Next
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.