Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Don't say diet: Oatmeal Cookie Pancakes

Most healthy eaters wouldn't chow down on oatmeal cookies for breakfast, but today's recipe makes a sweet compromise that can get the day off to a nutritious start.

Most healthy eaters wouldn't chow down on oatmeal cookies for breakfast, but today's recipe makes a sweet compromise that can get the day off to a nutritious start.

Rachael Ray's oatmeal cookie pancakes feature oats and fruit, but several other ingredients send this recipe's calorie and fat content soaring. Two of her pancakes with ¼ cup of maple syrup contain 609 calories and 17 grams of fat.

You can have two of my oatmeal cookie pancakes topped with ¼ cup of applesauce for 318 calories and 9.4 grams of fat.

Oatmeal Cookie Pancakes

1 cup old-fashioned oats

ADVERTISEMENT

½ cup all-purpose flour

½ cup white whole wheat flour

¼ cup packed brown sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ tablespoon ground cinnamon

1½ teaspoons vanilla

½ cup light sour cream

ADVERTISEMENT

½ cup fat-free milk

½ cup egg substitute

2 really ripe medium bananas, peeled and mashed up

½ cup raisins

¼ cup canola oil, divided use

2¼ cup no-sugar- added applesauce, divided use

Mix together oats, flours, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda and cinnamon in a large bowl. In another bowl, mix ¼ cup of the applesauce, the vanilla, egg substitute, light sour cream and fat-free milk. Whisk the wet ingredients into the dry ones until just combined, then fold in the mashed-up bananas and raisins. Stir in 3 tablespoons of the canola oil.

Heat a griddle over medium heat and lightly brush the griddle with remaining tablespoon of canola oil. Pour ¼ cupfuls of batter onto the griddle and cook the pancakes 3 to 4 minutes on each side, or until the tops are covered with bubbles and the edges look cooked.

ADVERTISEMENT

Just before serving, put the remaining 2 cups of applesauce in a microwave-safe container and microwave until warm.

What To Read Next
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.
2022 saw more than three times as many pediatric (up to age 5) cannabis edible exposures in Minnesota compared to 2021. Here's what you can do to prevent your toddler from getting into the gummies.