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Dobmeier takes sprints victory No. 11

Mark Dobmeier's strength is weaving in and out of lapped traffic. His moves were tested Friday night at River Cities Speedway. With about 15 laps to go in the Outlaw sprints feature, Dobmeier came up on Brenden Wilde of Thief River Falls. Dobmeie...

Mark Dobmeier's strength is weaving in and out of lapped traffic.

His moves were tested Friday night at River Cities Speedway.

With about 15 laps to go in the Outlaw sprints feature, Dobmeier came up on Brenden Wilde of Thief River Falls. Dobmeier had to react quickly.

"That was the closest call I had, I guess," the Grand Forks driver said. "The car in front of me started spinning out, and I was right on his tail, but I was able to do some quick, evasive action to avoid him."

After that Dobmeier was off the races, easily winning his 11th feature on the season. East Grand Forks' Bob Martin was second, followed by Minot's Greg Nikitenko.

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Dobmeier's 101st career win, including his seventh this year at RCS, came with him driving on the high side of the track.

"I think I found the high side before everybody else," Dobmeier said. "That's kind of what got me to the front. . . . Once I passed them, I'm sure they moved up a little bit."

Dobmeier said he's trying to get ready for the Knoxville Nationals in August in Iowa.

"We're trying to get a good forward stride for that," he said.

Dobmeier showed his good form Friday night.

"I usually kind of excel a bit in lapped traffic," Dobmeier said. "I have a tendency to be able to read the cars as I'm coming up to them rather than getting to them first."

In the late models feature on Hall of Fame night, Grand Forks' Dustin Hapka led until he became tangled up with Grand Forks' Steve Anderson. Hapka got a flat tire, so he had to go to the back on the restart. Anderson also was placed in the back after causing the accident.

That put Troy Schill in the lead, and the Grand Forks driver cruised to the victory, leading the rest of the way.

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It was Schill's first victory of the season at RCS. He said he's had condensation problems in his fuel.

"It was there in the heat race, but not in the feature," he said of the fuel troubles. "I think we kind of figured out what we have to do to get rid of them now."

Winnipeg's Mike Balcaen placed second in the late models feature.

Grand Forks' Dustin Strand led from start to finish to take the Midwest modifieds feature.

The points leader at RCS, Strand survived two restarts en route to the victory. The victory was Strand's third straight at RCS.

Patrick Sobolik of Fordville, N.D., was a distant second.

"Things have really been working lately," said Strand, who won Thursday night in Ada, Minn. "Luck has been on my side."

The streets feature had restart after restart and spinout after spinout. At one point, the streets had just two laps in and were lining up for a fourth restart.

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A fifth restart occurred after Aaron Olson's transmission exploded on turn 1. Workers had to clear the track of debris and cover transmission fluid after the Mekinock, N.D., driver's misfortune. Olson was leading the race.

Finally, race officials implemented a green-white-checkered finish because of a time limit. That's when Cliff Reeves of Minnewaukan, N.D., overtook Dan Arends of Devils Lake to win,

The victory was Reeves' first at RCS.

Car owner and promoter Dennis Spieker, promoter Bob Amundson and driver John Albrechtsen were inducted into the hall of fame after the heat races.

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