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Devils Lake resident injured in rollover

A Devils Lake resident was hospitalized early Sunday following a one-vehicle rollover accident near Cando, N.D. According to the North Dakota Highway Patrol, Bailey Mackey, 18, was driving a 2010 Chevrolet Silverado along N.D. Highway 17, about 1...

A Devils Lake resident was hospitalized early Sunday following a one-vehicle rollover accident near Cando, N.D.

According to the North Dakota Highway Patrol, Bailey Mackey, 18, was driving a 2010 Chevrolet Silverado along N.D. Highway 17, about 12 miles east of Cando, N.D., at about 2:15 a.m. Sunday, when it left the road and struck a field approach in the south ditch.

The vehicle then vaulted over the field approach and rolled, coming to rest on its right side.

Mackey, the lone occupant of the pickup, was transported by Towner County Ambulance Service to the Towner County Medical Center, and later flown to Altru Hospital in Grand Forks, where he was listed in satisfactory condition on Monday.

Mackey was charged with driving under the influence, according to the Highway Patrol.

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The North Dakota Highway Patrol, Towner County Ambulance Service and Devils Lake Rural Fire Department responded to the call.

Related Topics: ACCIDENTSDEVILS LAKE
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