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Devils Lake legislator's death will trigger election

The death of a North Dakota legislator over the weekend means another seat will be up for election in November, state officials said Monday. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"2619543","attributes":{"alt":"Curt Hofstad","class"...

The death of a North Dakota legislator over the weekend means another seat will be up for election in November, state officials said Monday.
Rep. Curt Hofstad, R-Devils Lake, died Saturday at the age of 70 of a suspected heart attack, his son said Monday. He had served in the Legislature since 2007, and he was not up for re-election this year. John Bjornson, code revisor with the North Dakota Legislative Council, said the timing of Hofstad's death means the seat will be on the ballot in November as a special election on the same day as the general election. But in the meantime, it's up to District 15 Republicans to fill the seat. "The district committee would basically decide how they're going to do it," Bjornson said. Dennis Miller, chairman of the District 15 Republicans, said Monday he wasn't prepared to comment on how the seat will be filled until after Hofstad's funeral this week. If the district's Republican leadership does not fill the seat within 21 days of being officially notified of the vacancy by the Legislative Management chairman, Grand Forks Republican Sen. Ray Holmberg, the decision will be left up to Holmberg. Holmberg said Monday afternoon he had not yet received official notification from the county auditor of the vacancy. Kylie Oversen, the chairwoman of the North Dakota Democratic-NPL Party, said they will find a candidate to run for that seat in November. Secretary of State Al Jaeger said the appointee and anyone else who wants to run for the position will have to file the correct paperwork to his office by 4 p.m. Sept. 6. A passion for farming Oversen, a Grand Forks Democrat who sat alongside Hofstad on the House's Human Services Committee, called his death a "shock." Miller said he "really appreciated" Hofstad as a legislator. "I think he spoke straight to you," he said. "You could believe what he said." Chad Hofstad, one of Curt Hofstad's three children, said his father had a passion for farming. He passed on that knowledge to Chad, who is a farmer near Starkweather, N.D. "He was a wonderful teacher," he said. "He was very respected that way because of the wide array of knowledge that he had." Hofstad said his father loved watching his grandchildren play sports and spending time with his family at Wood Lake. In his political career, Curt Hofstad "had a real passion for helping the people out and fighting for what he believed in at the state level," Chad Hofstad said. Curt Hofstad was also a member of the State Water Commission, and Gov. Jack Dalrymple called him a "great leader in North Dakota water management." A viewing will be held 4:30 p.m. Tuesday at Gilbertson Funeral Home in Devils Lake, followed by a 7:30 p.m. prayer service, Chad Hofstad said. A funeral service will be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Lake Region State College.The death of a North Dakota legislator over the weekend means another seat will be up for election in November, state officials said Monday.
Rep. Curt Hofstad, R-Devils Lake, died Saturday at the age of 70 of a suspected heart attack, his son said Monday. He had served in the Legislature since 2007, and he was not up for re-election this year.John Bjornson, code revisor with the North Dakota Legislative Council, said the timing of Hofstad's death means the seat will be on the ballot in November as a special election on the same day as the general election. But in the meantime, it's up to District 15 Republicans to fill the seat."The district committee would basically decide how they're going to do it," Bjornson said.Dennis Miller, chairman of the District 15 Republicans, said Monday he wasn't prepared to comment on how the seat will be filled until after Hofstad's funeral this week.If the district's Republican leadership does not fill the seat within 21 days of being officially notified of the vacancy by the Legislative Management chairman, Grand Forks Republican Sen. Ray Holmberg, the decision will be left up to Holmberg. Holmberg said Monday afternoon he had not yet received official notification from the county auditor of the vacancy.Kylie Oversen, the chairwoman of the North Dakota Democratic-NPL Party, said they will find a candidate to run for that seat in November. Secretary of State Al Jaeger said the appointee and anyone else who wants to run for the position will have to file the correct paperwork to his office by 4 p.m. Sept. 6.A passion for farmingOversen, a Grand Forks Democrat who sat alongside Hofstad on the House's Human Services Committee, called his death a "shock."Miller said he "really appreciated" Hofstad as a legislator."I think he spoke straight to you," he said. "You could believe what he said."Chad Hofstad, one of Curt Hofstad's three children, said his father had a passion for farming. He passed on that knowledge to Chad, who is a farmer near Starkweather, N.D."He was a wonderful teacher," he said. "He was very respected that way because of the wide array of knowledge that he had."Hofstad said his father loved watching his grandchildren play sports and spending time with his family at Wood Lake.In his political career, Curt Hofstad "had a real passion for helping the people out and fighting for what he believed in at the state level," Chad Hofstad said. Curt Hofstad was also a member of the State Water Commission, and Gov. Jack Dalrymple called him a "great leader in North Dakota water management."A viewing will be held 4:30 p.m. Tuesday at Gilbertson Funeral Home in Devils Lake, followed by a 7:30 p.m. prayer service, Chad Hofstad said. A funeral service will be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Lake Region State College.

Related Topics: RAY HOLMBERGAL JAEGER
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