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Denzel Washington's career

- "St. Elsewhere" (1982-88): The prognosis was decidedly positive for Washington after he played Dr. Philip Chandler in this gritty, cult-fave NBC series about a decaying teaching hospital.

- "St. Elsewhere" (1982-88): The prognosis was decidedly positive for Washington after he played Dr. Philip Chandler in this gritty, cult-fave NBC series about a decaying teaching hospital.

- "Glory" (1989): Ed Zwick's Civil War drama helped Washington become the first black actor to earn two best supporting actor nominations (the other was for "Cry Freedom") and the second (after Louis Gossett Jr.) to win in that category.

- "Malcolm X" (1992): Washington's fierce performance was a bit too fierce for the academy, which gave him a nomination but bestowed the award on Al Pacino (for "Scent of a Woman," go figure).

- "Philadelphia" (1993): Tom Hanks may have won the best actor Oscar, but wasn't this really Washington's movie? His performance as homophobic lawyer Joe Miller was the engine of the film.

- "Training Day" (2001): Anyone find it ironic that Washington had to play an out-and-out bad guy to finally win his best actor Oscar? He was mad, bad and dangerous as the gloriously corrupt Alonzo Harris.

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- "Inside Man" (2006): This cat-and-mouse hostage drama played to all the actor's strongest suits -- he was sexy, he was smart, he was funny and he owned the screen.

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