Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Death of man, 20, found in northern Minnesota ruled a homicide

DEER RIVER, Minn. -- A 20-year-old Hibbing man was found dead Sunday in rural Deer River in a case that authorities have ruled a homicide. David Alexander Haiman, 20, was found dead during the course of a stolen vehicle and missing person investi...

DEER RIVER, Minn. -- A 20-year-old Hibbing man was found dead Sunday in rural Deer River in a case that authorities have ruled a homicide.

David Alexander Haiman, 20, was found dead during the course of a stolen vehicle and missing person investigation, the Itasca County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

Authorities said a suspect, 36-year-old Joseph Christen Thoresen, of Grand Rapids, was arrested in connection with the incident. He is in the Itasca County Jail awaiting formal charges.

Few details were released Tuesday, but the sheriff’s office called it an “isolated incident” and said there was no danger to the public.

Haiman’s body was discovered in rural Deer River - northwest of Grand Rapids - during the course of the investigation, which also involved the Deer River and Grand Rapids police departments.

ADVERTISEMENT

Authorities said the body and the stolen vehicle were found in separate locations. They did not release any details on the nature of Haiman’s injuries or the relationship between the two men.

Haiman’s body was brought to the Ramsey County Medical Examiner’s Office in the Twin Cities, where an autopsy was planned to determine the cause of death.

Itasca County Search and Rescue and the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension also assisted in the ongoing investigation.

Related Topics: CRIME
What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.