Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Dayton vows to tax rich to increase education funding if elected governor

MOORHEAD - Former U.S. Sen. Mark Dayton brought his gubernatorial campaign to the Red River Valley this morning, declaring he wants to raise taxes on the wealthiest Minnesotans in order to improve funding for public education.

Mark Dayton
Former Minnesota U.S. Sen. Mark Dayton, now running for Minnesota governor, poses in his office in Minneapolis, Dec. 28, 2009. (AP Photo/Andy King)

MOORHEAD - Former U.S. Sen. Mark Dayton brought his gubernatorial campaign to the Red River Valley this morning, declaring he wants to raise taxes on the wealthiest Minnesotans in order to improve funding for public education.

Dayton, who's vying for the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party nomination, touted his 35 years of public service experience in state and federal government as the reason why he's the best candidate to lead Minnesota.

"I know how to win, but more importantly, I know how to govern," Dayton said before an audience of about a dozen supporters this morning at Moorhead's Heritage Hjemkomst Interpretive Center.

If elected, the St. Paul native said his first priority will be to raise taxes on the wealthiest 10 percent of Minnesotans in order to increase state funding for K-12 public education and lower college tuition costs.

"You can read my lips: Tax the rich," Dayton said, putting a spin on the famous quote from former President George H.W. Bush.

ADVERTISEMENT

Dayton said the wealthiest 10 percent of Minnesotans would include individuals making $143,000 or more annually and married couples who together make $172,000 or more annually.

Dayton's family founded the department store chain of the same name that later became the Target stores of today.

The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead and the Herald are owned by Forum Communications Co.

What To Read Next
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.