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Crookston school building finds prospective buyer

The Crookston School Board is considering a $25,000 bid to purchase the former Central Junior High School downtown. If the sale is approved at the board's meeting March 12, a portion of the school may be renovated into upscale or senior citizen a...

The Crookston School Board is considering a $25,000 bid to purchase the former Central Junior High School downtown.

If the sale is approved at the board's meeting March 12, a portion of the school may be renovated into upscale or senior citizen apartments, according to prospective buyer Monte Lund of Grand Forks-based Resource Management.

"There's a possibility to create some type of apartments, but everything needs to go through the city first," he said Monday.

Terms of the sale would allow the school district to lease the building's gymnasium and New Paths Area Learning Center as well as protect a monument built on the property in memory of two students killed in a shop explosion 30 years ago, according to Superintendent Wayne Gilman.

District officials have been trying to sell Central Junior High since the school board voted to close it in 2001. The building has roughly 69,000 square feet of space, according to a district advertisement to sell the building. It was built in 1957 as an addition to the 1914 high school, with further additions in 1991 and 1994.

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The original high school building was demolished in 1998 after the new high school opened near the University of Minnesota-Crookston.

Amanda Ricker

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