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Complaints: Pigeons flocking to downtown Crookston

CROOKSTON--Complaints about a feathery problem in downtown Crookston likely won't be fixed until colder weather sets in. City government has field reports of pigeons gathering in certain parts of town, with at least one complaint from a business ...

REUTERS
REUTERS

CROOKSTON-Complaints about a feathery problem in downtown Crookston likely won't be fixed until colder weather sets in.

City government has field reports of pigeons gathering in certain parts of town, with at least one complaint from a business owner in downtown Crookston.

"We hear about it from some building owners," City Administrator Shannon Stassen said Thursday. "I don't feel like there are any health concerns."

The city has tried to stay ahead of the problem by working with local experts, including a trapper who comes in the winter to survey, bait and trap pigeons as needed. The trapper, Stassen said, offers the service for free.

He trapped the birds in 2015, but when he came last winter the conditions were not ideal for trapping, Stassen said.

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"My understanding of that is it's best when it's fairly cold and there is a fair amount of snow cover," Stassen said.

Pigeons appear to have food sources in other parts of the area, such as the industrial park and agricultural plots, Stassen said, adding they are not just sticking around in downtown Crookston.

The trapper should be back this winter if needed, but there are some natural controls in place, such as predatory birds that hunt pigeons.

"Like any downtown, pigeons can pose a problem when the populations grow," Stassen said.

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