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COLUMNIST MARILYN HAGERTY: Taxpayers revolt in GF in '32

People of Grand Forks celebrated the 200th anniversary of the birth of George Washington 75 years ago with a program in the City Auditorium. In those days, birthdays of Washington and Abraham Lincoln on Feb. 12 were separate holidays.

People of Grand Forks celebrated the 200th anniversary of the birth of George Washington 75 years ago with a program in the City Auditorium. In those days, birthdays of Washington and Abraham Lincoln on Feb. 12 were separate holidays.

The annual harvesting of ice on the Red River Valley was almost complete by the end of February 1932. Below-zero weather in February had thickened the ice to about 20 inches compared with 15 inches earlier in the winter.

Grand Forks Ice & Fuel Co. had about 60 men and 20 teams of horses packing ice for home consumption and for the Western Fruit Express to use in railroad cars. Dunlevy Ice & Fuel Co. reported that it had been packing for the Great Northern Railway.

Grand Forks citizens were invited to visit the city's new $225,000 water treatment plant, and there was a picture of the new state Capitol to be built in Bismarck. Joseph Bell DeRe-

emer, local architect, was one of four who designed the building.

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Behind the scenes, taxpayers in Grand Forks were agitated. More than 1,000 signed a petition seeking relief from the burden of taxes without crippling the progress of the city or county.

The taxpayers pointed out that 1,500 people in the city depended on charity to live. A canvass was made of the city to help place more people in jobs. Seven hundred attended a meeting of the Grand Forks City Taxpayers Association and heard the rates assailed by Dr. J.E. Engstad.

These efforts did not fall on deaf ears. By the end of February, there were stories in the Herald about candidates for city offices pledging to cut taxes.

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There was a total enrollment of 1,550 for the new semester at UND. An early enrollment of 1,003 showed a ratio of 631 men and 372 women.

North Dakota routed the champion University of South Dakota Coyotes by a score of 40-22. The Herald's C.D. Locklin said the Sioux still were very much in the running for the conference tournament. The coach was Clem Letich.

In another report, the Herald said: "Led by brilliant little Cliff Purpur, the Grand Forks Dragons turned back the mighty Roseau Cloverleafs at the Arena with a 6 to 4 victory." Roseau had won the previous game 4-2.

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Names in the news 75 years ago:

-- J.M. Lamb, a Michigan, N.D., businessman, died. He had come to Michigan in 1881 and operated a general store. He was one of the organizers of the Lamb Band and was associated with J.P. Lamb Land Co. and Lamb Elevator Co.

-- Rev. Daniel Kerr, Mendenhall Memorial Presbyterian Church of East Grand Forks, gave the principal address at a rally of Presbyterianism at First Presbyterian Church in Grand Forks. It was attended by 500 people.

-- The Rev. H.G. Klemme arrived from Bozeman, Mont., to take the pastor post at First Presbyterian Church vacated by the Rev. F. Halsey Ambrose. Ambrose was moving to St. Paul.

-- J.D. Bacon, Grand Forks Holstein breeder with 21 cattle, made a clean sweep of the division at annual Crookston Winter Shows.

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