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CNN Web poll: High ratings for N.D. senators, low for Minnesota's

FARGO Depending upon which side of the Red River you live, it seems you have a different perspective about how your U.S. senators are performing. According to a poll on CNN's Web site, residents of North Dakota graded the work of Sens. Byron Dorg...

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FARGO

Depending upon which side of the Red River you live, it seems you have a different perspective about how your U.S. senators are performing.

According to a poll on CNN's Web site, residents of North Dakota graded the work of Sens. Byron Dorgan and Kent Conrad higher than any other pair of senators in the nation during the second 100 days of Obama's presidency.

In Minnesota, however, despite Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken's overall average grade of a "C-plus," a significant number of respondents - 46 percent - gave the pair either a "D" or "F" grade for performance.

CNN's poll was conducted to gauge Americans' feelings about how President Barack Obama and Congress have performed during his second 100 days in office, which started May 4.

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The entire poll about his second 100 days is available at http://reportcard.cnn.com .

The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead and the Herald are Forum Communications Co. newspapers.

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