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BUSINESS: McFarlane among nation's top three business owners

A Grand Forks businessman was named one of the nation's top small business owners Tuesday by the U.S. Small Business Administration. Dave McFarlane, president of McFarlane Sheet Metal, won second-runner up in the National Small Business Person of...

A Grand Forks businessman was named one of the nation's top small business owners Tuesday by the U.S. Small Business Administration.

Dave McFarlane, president of McFarlane Sheet Metal, won second-runner up in the National Small Business Person of the Year award ceremony during the SBA's two-day National Small Business Week conference in Washington, D.C. McFarlane advanced to the national round of judging after being named North Dakota's winner last month.

According to SBA spokesman Dennis Byrne, the award essentially means McFarlane is the country's third best small business owner. Byrne said winners from each state were reviewed by a SBA panel before the awards ceremony.

McFarlane finished behind a pair of Native American sisters from North Carolina and the president of a grain operation in Illinois. Bobbie Jacobs-Ghaffar and Lesa Jacobs, owners of Native Angels Homecare and Hospice in Lumberton, N.C., took home the award. Jay Johnson, president of Johnson Grain in Waverly, Ill., was the first runner-up.

Byrne said winners are selected on their record of stability, growth in employment and sales, financial condition, innovation, response to adversity and community service.

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McFarlane started working at McFarlane Sheet Metal in 1979. He took over the company from his father in 1981.

Edison reports on business. Reach him at (701) 780-1107, (800) 477-6572, ext. 107; or jedison@gfherald.com .

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