Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Bill would allow underage service members to drink on base

A bill introduced in the North Dakota Legislature would allow underage active military service members to drink alcohol on base. The bill, sponsored by state Rep. Andrew Maragos, R-Minot, is scheduled for a hearing Tuesday morning in the House Ju...

We are part of The Trust Project.

A bill introduced in the North Dakota Legislature would allow underage active military service members to drink alcohol on base.

The bill, sponsored by state Rep. Andrew Maragos, R-Minot, is scheduled for a hearing Tuesday morning in the House Judiciary Committee. It would allow service members between the ages of 18 and 21 to purchase and consume alcohol on a military installation in North Dakota if it's authorized by that base's commanding officer.

Maragos, the lone sponsor on the bill, said he is bringing it forward on behalf of a citizen. He said the rationale has to do with promoting camaraderie and trust among service members who may be relaxing in the evening and discussing that day's work.

"If you're in combat, you have to be able to trust and think you know the guy in the foxhole next to you," said Maragos, an Vietnam veteran.

He said that he plans to introduce an amendment to the bill that would allow underage service members to drink off base as well, at the request of the citizen, who Maragos believes is not currently an active service member. Maragos said he's not sure if he would support that amendment.

ADVERTISEMENT

He acknowledged that the bill will be "very difficult" to pass.

"But we have to try," he said. "That's what this process is about."

Lt. James Fisher, a public affairs officer at the Grand Forks Air Force Base, said the base would decline to comment on the proposal.

What to read next
What are your favorite holiday foods? In this NewsMD column, a local chef demonstrates his mother's amazing Christmas lasagna. And Viv Williams explores how holiday food traditions can be good for your health.
Do you overindulge on Thanksgiving? A lot of people do. It can be hard to resist recipes you only get during the holidays. But if you chow down on foods and drinks that are high in salt, fat or caffeine, you may be at risk of "holiday heart." Viv Williams has details from Mayo Clinic cardiologists in this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion."
What's on your "what I'm thankful for" list this Thanksgiving? On a trip to Central America, Viv Williams visits a vibrant health clinic and adds the team she met there to her gratitude list. Find out why in this NewsMD, "Health Fusion" column.
In exchange for their tax exempt status, Mayo and other nonprofit hospitals must offer free or discounted care to eligible patients. But a Post Bulletin investigation discovered that some eligible patients sued by Mayo Clinic for unpaid medical bills didn't know this option existed.