Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Bill allowing underage military members to drink fails

A bill that would have allowed underage active military members to drink alcohol was voted down Friday in the North Dakota House. The bill as introduced would have allowed members of the military ages 18 to 20 to consume alcohol on a military bas...

A bill that would have allowed underage active military members to drink alcohol was voted down Friday in the North Dakota House.

The bill as introduced would have allowed members of the military ages 18 to 20 to consume alcohol on a military base if the commanding officer allowed it. The bill, introduced by Rep. Andrew Maragos, R-Minot, was amended to allow active military members to drink on "any premises licensed to sell alcoholic beverages."

The Judiciary Committee issued a do-not-pass recommendation on the bill, and the House voted 67-23 against it Friday.

The bill was introduced on behalf of a citizen who was upset that he couldn't thank underage military members for their service with a beer, according to Rep. Diane Larson, R-Bismarck, the chairwoman of the House Judiciary Committee.

"It upset him that these young men and women, who were mature enough to go and serve their country, but not considered mature enough to drink alcohol," Larson said of the citizen. "In fact, he stated that they were the most responsible group of people that age."

ADVERTISEMENT

Larson said, however, that the Judiciary Committee heard testimony about substance abuse among veterans and concerns that allowing younger service members drink "would be a dangerous trend." She also said binge drinking rates among young adults in North Dakota are the second-highest in the country.

"Although we have the greatest respect for our military, we do not feel that supplying them with alcohol is the best way to demonstrate that," Larson said.

What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.