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Attorney seeks to suppress statement in Willmar murder case

WILLMAR, Minn. -- The attorney for a teen charged in his grandmother's killing wants a portion of the teen's statements to law enforcement officers disallowed in his trial.

WILLMAR, Minn. -- The attorney for a teen charged in his grandmother's killing wants a portion of the teen's statements to law enforcement officers disallowed in his trial.

Attorney Daniel Mohs argued Friday that the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension agents who questioned Robert Warwick after the homicide of Lila Warwick on July 29 did not advise him of his Miranda rights after they had informed him that he was under arrest and would face murder charges.

Friday's hearing was before District Judge David Mennis, who will issue a ruling on the evidence after attorneys have filed briefs with the court.

Warwick, 18, and Brok Junkermeier, 19, of Willmar, have been indicted on first-degree murder charges in the death of Lila Warwick, 79, at her Willmar residence. Both face the possibility of life in prison and are held in the Kandiyohi County Jail on $2 million bail.

Junkermeier's trial is scheduled for March.

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Robert Warwick is accused of being the mastermind of the crime, allegedly motivated by a large amount of money he suspected his grandmother had. Junkermeier is alleged to have stabbed and strangled her after making her write him a check from her bank account.

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