Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Ask the Herald: What will La Nina mean for the coming winter in Grand Forks?

Q. La Nina is on the way. What does that mean for weather in Grand Forks? A. Grand Forks may be in for an extra-cold shock this winter. Below-average sea surface temperatures have arrived in the tropical Pacific, a condition known as La Nina. Thi...

Q. La Nina is on the way. What does that mean for weather in Grand Forks?

A. Grand Forks may be in for an extra-cold shock this winter.

Below-average sea surface temperatures have arrived in the tropical Pacific, a condition known as La Nina. This could result in colder, wetter winter conditions throughout the northern part of the U.S., including Grand Forks, according to predictions. WDAZ, which is owned by Forum Communications Co., the parent company of the Herald, issued a La Nina advisory Friday.

The chances for lower-than-average temperatures as a result of La Nina are easier to predict than precipitation levels, said Jim Kaiser, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Grand Forks. However, he cautioned La Nina does not automatically mean the whole winter in Grand Forks will be colder than usual. Other factors, such as how early the area receives snow, play a role.

"The fact that we're not adding snow on the ground here in November is a plus because every day is one less day of winter," Kaiser said. "That sun angle is just so low on the horizon it doesn't have enough strength to help melt anything on its own."

ADVERTISEMENT

He explained the late-arriving snow could help mitigate the colder temperatures brought on by La Nina.

"A normal winter will feel colder than the last two," Kaiser added, "because of how crazy warm we were last winter."

What To Read Next
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.
2022 saw more than three times as many pediatric (up to age 5) cannabis edible exposures in Minnesota compared to 2021. Here's what you can do to prevent your toddler from getting into the gummies.