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Apple says has never worked with NSA on iPhone backdoors

Apple Inc responded on Tuesday to reports that the National Security Agency had developed a system to hack into and monitor iPhones called "Dropout Jeep," saying it never worked with the U.S. spy agency and was unaware of efforts to target its sm...

iPhone 5C
People check out several versions of the new iPhone 5C after Apple Inc's media event in Cupertino, California September 10, 2013. (REUTERS/STEPHEN LAM)

Apple Inc responded on Tuesday to reports that the National Security Agency had developed a system to hack into and monitor iPhones called "Dropout Jeep," saying it never worked with the U.S. spy agency and was unaware of efforts to target its smartphones.

Germany's Der Spiegel reported this week that a secretive unit of the NSA, now under fire for the extent and depth of its spying programs around the world, makes specialized gear and software to infiltrate and monitor a plethora of computing devices, including mobile phones.

(here)

The report included an NSA graphic dated 2008 that outlined a system in development called DROPOUTJEEP, calling it a "software implant" that allows infiltrators to push and pull and retrieve data from iPhones such as contact lists. Der Spiegel referred to it as a "trojan," or malware that helps hackers get into protected systems.

The report, which surfaced on Sunday, did not suggest that Apple had cooperated with the U.S. spying agency on so-called backdoors.

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The iPhone was a relatively new-fangled gadget in 2008. It hit the market in 2007 and proceeded to help revolutionize the mobile phone industry.

"Apple has never worked with the NSA to create a backdoor in any of our products, including iPhone. Additionally, we have been unaware of this alleged NSA program targeting our products," the company said in a statement.

"We will continue to use our resources to stay ahead of malicious hackers and defend our customers from security attacks, regardless of who's behind them."

Related Topics: TECHNOLOGY
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