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Amazing Grains invites public input on proposed 'community kitchen'

The public is invited to a meeting of Amazing Grains Food Co-op members Tuesday to hear details and discuss a proposal to launch a community kitchen.

The public is invited to a meeting of Amazing Grains Food Co-op members Tuesday to hear details and discuss a proposal to launch a community kitchen.

The meeting is set for 6:30 p.m. at The 701 Co-Working Space, 33 S. Third St.

"We are interested in what the public has to say," said Tyler Manske who, along with four others, is working on a project feasibility study.

"You won't have to be a co-op member" to rent the facility, he said.

The community kitchen would provide space for culinary activities or for potential entrepreneurs to try out an idea for a food-related business without risking a significant start-up investment.

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It could be used for activities such as cooking classes and pop-up kitchens, for acquiring certification in the culinary field or for anything related to cooking in general, Manske said.

Income would be generated by short- or long-term rental agreements, said Manske, who's been looking into such operations that are running successfully in Fargo, Bemidji and Minneapolis.

The Amazing Grains Food Co-op closed its organic grocery store and deli at 214 DeMers Ave. in May in the wake of financial difficulties.

Since then, co-op members have been trying to determine if they should pursue another venture or dissolve the organization.

In a survey conducted a few months ago, the "overwhelming response" was that people were not in favor of dissolution, Manske said.

Those who can't attend Tuesday's meeting but want more information can contact the co-op board at board@amazinggrains.org or Manske at tyler.j.manske@gmail.com .

Pamela Knudson is a features and arts/entertainment writer for the Grand Forks Herald.

She has worked for the Herald since 2011 and has covered a wide variety of topics, including the latest performances in the region and health topics.

Pamela can be reached at pknudson@gfherald.com or (701) 780-1107.
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