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Alleged thieves butt-dial boss, tell him about stealing company equipment

MIAMI, Fla. - An accidental cellphone call landed two Florida men in jail after their employer heard them discussing plans to steal and sell $8,000 in construction equipment, according to police.

MIAMI, Fla. - An accidental cellphone call landed two Florida men in jail after their employer heard them discussing plans to steal and sell $8,000 in construction equipment, according to police.

David Fanuelsen, 39, and Dean Brown, 22, remained in jail on Monday facing charges of felony grand theft.

Their troubles started when Fanuelsen, a construction worker, unintentionally dialed his boss from a phone in his back pocket last Tuesday night, the Key West Police Department said.

The employer, Stace Valenzuela, told Reuters he overheard the men discussing plans to sell company equipment.

At the job site where both worked, Valenzuela found three saws missing. He said he then realized that he had received an earlier accidental call in which the men planned the robbery in a voice message.

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"Talk about bumbling idiots," Valenzuela said in an interview.

As of Monday, Fanuelsen and Brown had not posted bond, which was set at $10,000 each, according to Monroe County Sheriff's Office records. It was not immediately clear if they had lawyers, and the public defender's office was not immediately available for comment. (Editing by Letitia Stein and Lisa Von Ahn)

Related Topics: CRIMETHEFT
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