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After flying motorcycle goes viral, SUV driver steps forward

ST. PAUL -- The driver whose lost load sent a motorcyle flying June 18 on Interstate 94 has stepped forward after a video of the incident was publicized on local media and generated more than a million views.

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ST. PAUL -- The driver whose lost load sent a motorcyle flying June 18 on Interstate 94 has stepped forward after a video of the incident was publicized on local media and generated more than a million views.

The driver was Kyle Robert Gunderson, 35, of Menominee, Wis., according to the Minnesota State Patrol. Gunderson contacted the patrol once he realized it was his load that caused the crash. Investigation into the crash continues.

Gunderson was pulling a boat with a large, rolled-up foam pad tied on the back. As he headed east down I-94 in Woodbury, the foam pad came free of the boat and slid into the path of a motorcyclist who was following in the same lane. The motorcycle went airborne and crashed when it struck the foam pad, and the whole scene was captured on video by a motorist in the next lane .

The woman who posted the video, Linda Leverty, said she and a few other motorists stopped to help. The motorcyclist suffered only minor injuries in spite of the violent collision.

The black SUV towing the boat never stopped and the driver, Gunderson, apparently was oblivious to the wipeout the foam pad caused behind him.

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The Minnesota State Patrol said it has issued about 1,000 citations or warnings for improper loads so far this year. The patrol recommends using ratchet straps to secure loads rather than twine or rope and urges people to cover trailers and boats when towing so objects don't "fly out and become projectiles."

A 20-pound object hitting a vehicle at 55 mph has an impact of half a ton, according to the State Patrol.

Related Topics: ACCIDENTS
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