Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Advisory panel support N.D. tuition limits

BISMARCK - A Board of Higher Education advisory panel is supporting a 5 percent limit on North Dakota college tuition increases next year. The state's 11 public colleges have not set their tuition rates for the next academic year, and some still ...

BISMARCK - A Board of Higher Education advisory panel is supporting a 5 percent limit on North Dakota college tuition increases next year.

The state's 11 public colleges have not set their tuition rates for the next academic year, and some still may ask permission to charge higher rates, said Laura Glatt, the university system's vice chancellor for administrative affairs. She said colleges also have permission to raise tuition by smaller amounts if they choose.

The board's Budget and Finance Committee reviewed recommendations on Monday to keep tuition limits at 5 percent for the 2007-08 academic year.

The committee includes three board members. The full board, which has eight voting members, will be discussing the issue Thursday during the board's next meeting in Wahpeton.

The North Dakota Legislature included the 5 percent tuition increase cap in the state university system's budget bill for the next two years.

ADVERTISEMENT

If any college wishes to charge higher rates, it must seek permission from the Legislature's Budget Section, an interim committee that includes members of the North Dakota House and Senate appropriations committees.

Gov. John Hoeven signed the university system's budget bill during a ceremony at Minot State University on Monday.

"This legislation, which includes a range of new grant, assistance and savings programs for students and families, will help hold the line on tuition increases and keep the cost of a college education in North Dakota affordable," the governor said.

What To Read Next
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.