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A look at the higher ed board nominees

North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven plans to interview three nominees and appoint the next member to the state Board of Higher Education in the coming weeks.

North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven plans to interview three nominees and appoint the next member to the state Board of Higher Education in the coming weeks.

They are:

- Michael Haugen, 61, of Fargo, the retired adjutant general of North Dakota. Haugen lists business con-sultant on his application as his current occupation.

He earned a bachelor's degree from Minot State University and attended Valley City State University for two years.

Haugen lists North Dakota University System Chancellor Bill Goetz among his references.

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- Robert Harms, 52, a Bismarck attorney who was former gubernatorial legal counsel to Hoeven and Ed Schafer.

He earned a bachelor's degree from North Dakota State University and a juris doctorate from UND.

Harms was outspoken re-cently against a proposed sales tax increase that would have raised money for the Bismarck Park District.

- Duane Pool, 46, Bismarck, a science coordinator for The Nature Conservancy.

He earned doctorate, master's and bachelor's degrees from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, where he had teaching and research positions.

Pool also has been an adjunct faculty member for Rasmussen College and the University of Mary.

The Herald and the Forum are Forum Communications Co. newspapers.

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