Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

A few tips to beat the heat

The Minnesota Department of Health offers these tips to beat the heat: - Drink more fluids than usual but avoid fluids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar. Check with your doctor if you have been advised to limit your intake of fluids ...

The Minnesota Department of Health offers these tips to beat the heat:

- Drink more fluids than usual but avoid fluids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar. Check with your doctor if you have been advised to limit your intake of fluids or placed on diuretics.

- Stay indoors in an air-conditioned location, if possible. If your home is not air-conditioned, spending a few hours a day in an air-conditioned public place like a public library or shopping mall will help your body cope with the heat.

- Don't rely on electric fans -- they may make you more comfortable, but don't do much to prevent heat-related illness.

- Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.

ADVERTISEMENT

- Never leave people or animals in a closed, parked vehicle.

- Check regularly on people who may be at higher risk of heat-related illness -- infants and young children, people more than 65, people with mental illness and people with chronic health problems like heart disease or high blood pressure.

- If you must spend time outdoors, try to limit your activity to morning and evening. Try to take rest breaks in shady areas.

- Limit physical exercise. Again, when you do exercise, be sure to take in plenty of fluids.

n When you're outdoors, wear hats and use sunscreen to protect yourself from the sun.

Related Topics: WEATHER
What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.