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A few of the true American brave

Brisk winds chilled a holiday which, for many, marks the beginning of summer. The weather was a small sacrifice to endure for about 100 people who gathered at Resurrection Cemetery in East Grand Forks to remember soldiers, sailors and others who ...

Brisk winds chilled a holiday which, for many, marks the beginning of summer.

The weather was a small sacrifice to endure for about 100 people who gathered at Resurrection Cemetery in East Grand Forks to remember soldiers, sailors and others who died defending American freedom in Europe, Korea, Vietnam, the Pacific and the Middle East.

The conditions didn't escape the attention of U.S. Army National Guard Capt. Jason Peterson, who gave the Memorial Day address.

"You bring thoughts of home and loved ones," Peterson told onlookers, many wearing blankets or heavy spring coats. "Every little bit helps."

Peterson, a 16-year veteran, reminded the crowd that the United States is at war in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the vast majority of citizens support the efforts and sacrifices of American service men and women.

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"Without them, we would have nothing," Peterson said.

Two wreaths were laid and the names of 37 departed comrades were read. A squad from VFW Post 3817 and American Legion Post 157 fired the ceremonial salute, followed by the playing of "Taps" and "Echo" by Larry Braford of East Grand Forks.

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