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A dandy dilemma to have

Grafton's Anthony Kliniske has some decisions to make. The 6-foot-6 senior-to-be is a bruising tight end for the Grafton High School football team. He said he has drawn interest from the football teams at UND and North Dakota State. But deciding ...

Grafton's Anthony Kliniske has some decisions to make.

The 6-foot-6 senior-to-be is a bruising tight end for the Grafton High School football team. He said he has drawn interest from the football teams at UND and North Dakota State.

But deciding between North Dakota college football rivals isn't the toughest decision Kliniske needs to make.

The biggest decision will be whether Kliniske chooses football or baseball after high school.

The hard-throwing right-hander has caught the eye of some Major League Baseball scouts this summer with his size and speedy fastball.

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"I'm kind of leaning toward baseball," said Kliniske at the East Grand Forks Classic baseball tournament at Stauss Park on Saturday. "I feel like baseball can get me the farthest."

Klinske said his fastball has been clocked at 91 miles per hour and that he consistently throws about 88 mph.

Kliniske, who also plays shortstop or third base when he doesn't pitch, worked out in Jamestown for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.

"I've also been invited to one in Minneapolis," Kliniske said. "And there's one in Mandan for the Twins and the Padres."

All-around success

Pitching is likely his future, but Kliniske has proven capable at the plate for Grafton during the high school and American Legion seasons.

Entering the weekend, he's batting .408 with 29 runs and 25 runs batted in.

During the high school season, Kliniske led the Spoilers to a fifth-place finish at the North Dakota state Class B baseball tournament. He batted .354 with 15 extra base hits, 16 stolen bases, 20 RBIs and 33 runs. On the mound, he was 6-1 with 55 strikeouts and a 0.40 earned run average.

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No matter the season, Kliniske has a sport in which to excel.

On the football field last fall, Kliniske caught 37 passes for 475 yards.

And he's no slouch on the basketball court, either, where he averaged 19.5 points, 12.3 rebounds and 2.2 blocks per game.

Legion team

is struggling

Not all things are going smoothly, though, for Kliniske. The Grafton American Legion baseball team is in a bit of a funk.

"We're on about a five-game slide. It's like nothing I've ever seen here," said Grafton coach Chad Kliniske, Anthony's father.

At the EGF Classic this weekend, Grafton is 0-3.

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Grafton lost 13-8 to St. Boniface on Friday, then 10-3 to Thief River Falls and 7-0 to Midway-Minto on Saturday. The losses drop Grafton to 14-14 this season.

"We haven't been on track," Chad Kliniske said. "We've maybe played two good games all year. And the part that bothers me is that it doesn't seem to be too important to the kids."

Reach Miller at 780-1120, (800) 477-6572 ext. 120 or tmiller@gfherald.com .

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