Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

53,000 letters mailed out in Fargo traffic fine case

Letters have arrived in the mailboxes of more than 53,000 drivers letting them know they qualify for part of a $1.5 million settlement with the city of Fargo.

Letters have arrived in the mailboxes of more than 53,000 drivers letting them know they qualify for part of a $1.5 million settlement with the city of Fargo.

The letters are the latest step in resolving a 2007 class-action lawsuit brought by West Fargo resident Stephanie Sauby, who alleged that the city of Fargo charged more than was allowed under state law for traffic violations.

The $1.5 million settlement agreement was preliminarily approved in July. The letters sent out this month notify drivers that they are eligible to receive up to 65 cents for each dollar in traffic fines they paid that exceeded limits set by North Dakota law.

Drivers must decide whether to participate in the settlement by Nov. 2 by submitting a claim form indicating their interest.

Fargo city attorney Erik Johnson said it's hard to say how many drivers will file a claim to participate in the settlement.

ADVERTISEMENT

"Normally, I've heard that return rates on class-action notices is fairly low," Johnson said. "I don't know what this will bring in."

There is also a choice to opt out of the settlement. By doing so, drivers state they don't want to take part in the settlement and will not receive any portion of the settlement money. The drivers must choose whether to opt out by Nov. 2.

Final approval of the settlement will be decided in Fargo U.S. District Court at a hearing on Nov. 30.

The Herald and the Forum are both owned by Forum Communications Co.

What To Read Next
Artificial intelligence can now act as an artist or a writer. Does that mean AI is ready to play doctor? Many institutions, including Mayo Clinic, believe that AI is ready to become a useful tool.
Josh Sipes was watching an in-flight movie when he became aware the flight crew were asking for help assisting a woman who was experiencing a medical problem.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.