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U.S., Canada aboriginal tribes form alliance to stop oil pipelines

Aboriginal tribes from Canada and the northern United States signed a treaty on Thursday to jointly fight proposals to build more pipelines to carry crude from Alberta's oil sands, saying further development would damage the environment.The treat...

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Flags from the dozens of tribes that have offered support to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe line the main entrance to an encampment in Cannon Ball. REUTERS / Andrew Cullen
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Aboriginal tribes from Canada and the northern United States signed a treaty on Thursday to jointly fight proposals to build more pipelines to carry crude from Alberta's oil sands, saying further development would damage the environment.

The treaty came as the politics around pipelines have become increasingly sensitive in North America, with the U.S. Justice Department intervening last week to delay construction of a contentious pipeline in North Dakota.

The Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion was signed by 50 aboriginal groups in North America, who also plan to oppose tanker and rail projects in both countries, they said in a statement.

Targets include projects proposed by Kinder Morgan Inc , TransCanada Corp and Enbridge Inc.

The Canadian Energy Pipeline Association declined to provide immediate comment.

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While aboriginal groups have long opposed oil sands development, the treaty signals a more coordinated approach to fight proposals.

Among the treaty's signatories is the Standing Rock Sioux tribe who opposes the Dakota pipeline.

"What this treaty means is that from Quebec, we will work with allies in (British Columbia) to make sure that the Kinder Morgan pipeline does not pass," Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon said in the statement.

"And we will also work with our tribal allies in Minnesota as they take on Enbridge's Line 3 expansion, and we know they'll help us do the same against Energy East," he said, referring to TransCanada's plan to carry 1.1 million barrels of crude per day from Alberta to Canada's East Coast.

The statement did not specify what actions the groups would take to stop development.

Canada is assessing oil pipeline proposals as the country's energy-rich province Alberta reels from a crash in prices, partly due to insufficient means of moving oil to lucrative international markets.

Related Topics: DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE
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