ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

North Dakota woman gets 5 years for infant's starvation death, child abuse

Paige Howling Wolf, of Parshall, pleaded guilty late last year to charges of involuntary manslaughter, child neglect and child abuse stemming from a June 24, 2020, emergency call on the Fort Berthold Reservation.

3713.jpg
Paige Howling Wolf
We are part of The Trust Project.

BISMARCK — A 28-year-old woman has been sentenced in federal court to five years in prison on manslaughter and child abuse charges in a case in which investigators said the woman's infant died from starvation and three other children had meth in their systems.

Paige Howling Wolf, of Parshall, pleaded guilty late last year to charges of involuntary manslaughter, child neglect and child abuse stemming from a June 2020 emergency call on the Fort Berthold Reservation.

Paramedics responded to a report of an unresponsive infant at Howling Wolf's home, according to a news release from prosecutors.

Her 9-month-old child was declared dead at the scene. An autopsy revealed the baby died from chronic starvation, according to prosecutors.

Three of Howling Wolf's four other children had meth in their systems, prosecutors said. Those three children were not older than 7 years old, according to court documents.

I'm a reporter and a photographer and sometimes I create videos to go with my stories.

I graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead and in my time with The Forum I have covered a number of beats, from cops and courts to business and education.

I've also written about UFOs, ghosts, dinosaur bones and the planet Pluto.

You may reach me by phone at 701-241-5555, or by email at dolson@forumcomm.com
What to read next
With the ban looming, some lawmakers and attorneys are raising concerns about small inconsistencies within the state’s abortion laws that they believe could make a big difference to medical providers trying to treat pregnant patients without stepping on legal landmines.
Attorneys are frustrated about not being able to connect with clients held at North Dakota prisons. It’s a problem that's gone on for years, lawyers said.
Attorney Kiara Kraus-Parr argued that Chad Isaak was not present during parts of jury selection for his trial, which would violate his right to question potential jurors. She also claimed the court wrongfully held pretrial conferences off the record and sealed documents that should have been public.
The programs in North Dakota and Minnesota, funded by the U.S. Treasury, are meant to help with mortgage and other homeownership costs that people struggled to pay during the pandemic.