ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

North Dakota tribal groups receive funding for head start programs

According to a Tuesday, Dec. 7, release from Sen. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., the Cankdeska Cikana Community College will receive nearly $1.4 million in funding, while the Three Affiliated Tribes will receive more than $1.2 million.

4154786+GFH Brief.jpg
Herald news graphic
We are part of The Trust Project.

Cankdeska Cikana Community College, and the Three Affiliated Tribes have been awarded substantial funding for Head Start programs.

According to a Tuesday, Dec. 7, release from Sen. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., the Cankdeska Cikana Community College will receive nearly $1.4 million in funding, while the Three Affiliated Tribes will receive more than $1.2 million.

The funds come through the Head Start and Early Head Start programs, which promote school readiness for young children and toddlers from low-income families. The programs work to enhance children’s cognitive, social and emotional development, as well as early learning, health and family well-being.

The Cankdeska Cikana Community College is located in Fort Totten, on the Spirit Lake reservation. The Three Affiliated Tribes, also known as the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, are located on the Fort Berthold Indian reservation in central North Dakota.

Adam Kurtz is the community editor for the Grand Forks Herald. He covers higher education and other topics in Grand Forks County and the city.

Kurtz joined the Herald in July 2019. He covered business and county government topics before covering higher education and some military topics.

Tips and story ideas are welcome. Get in touch with him at akurtz@gfherald.com, or DM at @ByAdamKurtz.

Desk: 701-780-1110
What to read next
The board failed to properly provide notice of a special committee meeting in March.
With the ban looming, some lawmakers and attorneys are raising concerns about small inconsistencies within the state’s abortion laws that they believe could make a big difference to medical providers trying to treat pregnant patients without stepping on legal landmines.
Attorneys are frustrated about not being able to connect with clients held at North Dakota prisons. It’s a problem that's gone on for years, lawyers said.
Attorney Kiara Kraus-Parr argued that Chad Isaak was not present during parts of jury selection for his trial, which would violate his right to question potential jurors. She also claimed the court wrongfully held pretrial conferences off the record and sealed documents that should have been public.