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North Dakota Public Service Commission to hold hearing on electric vehicle regulation

The panel will hold a hearing on "the electrification of transportation" at the state Capitol in Bismarck at 2 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3.

North Dakota Public Service Commissioner Julie Fedorchak, speaks at a commission meeting Monday, Aug. 14, 2017. Bismarck Tribune
North Dakota Public Service Commissioner Julie Fedorchak, speaks at a commission meeting Monday, Aug. 14, 2017.
Bismarck Tribune photo
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BISMARCK — The North Dakota Public Service Commission is asking for feedback on how to regulate electric vehicles as a national push away from gas-powered cars continues.

The all-Republican, three-member panel will hold a hearing on "the electrification of transportation" at the state Capitol in Bismarck at 2 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3. Written comments submitted to ndpsc@nd.gov will also be accepted through Nov. 14.

A bipartisan federal infrastructure bill passed last year directed states to "consider measures to promote greater electrification of the transportation sector," which could include establishing rates to promote affordable electric vehicle charging for residential, commercial and public use.

The commission also expressed interest in hearing public comment about:

  • Whether ownership of charging stations should be permitted by regulated utilities.
  • Whether special tariffs or rates for residential electric vehicle charging should be considered.
  • Whether the commission should consider any pilot programs related to electric transportation.

North Dakota may soon play a role in the domestic electric vehicle supply chain. Officials unveiled a plan Wednesday to create a mineral processing plant in Mercer County that would supply car brand Tesla with materials needed for electric vehicle batteries.

Jeremy Turley is a Bismarck-based reporter for Forum News Service, which provides news coverage to publications owned by Forum Communications Company.
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