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More than 8,000 gallons of oil spill in Williams County after pipeline ruptures

The spill about 14 miles south of Tioga impacted agricultural land, but no oil flowed into water sources.

Forum News Service file photo
Forum News Service file photo
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BISMARCK — An estimated 8,400 gallons of crude oil spilled from a pipeline in Williams County, N.D., on Tuesday, Sept. 20, according to a news release from the state Department of Environmental Quality.

Stealth Oilwell Services, a third-party contractor, struck a pipeline owned by Enable Bakken Crude while digging in the ground. Enable Bakken Crude is a subsidiary of Texas-based Energy Transfer, which operates the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The spill about 14 miles south of Tioga impacted agricultural land, but no oil flowed into water sources, according to paperwork filed by an Energy Transfer employee. If severe enough, oil spills can render affected farmland unusable for years after the fact.

The pipeline was shut down after the spill, and workers have recovered most of the spilled oil.

Department officials will continue inspecting the site and monitoring remediation efforts, according to the release.

Jeremy Turley is a Bismarck-based reporter for Forum News Service, which provides news coverage to publications owned by Forum Communications Company.
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